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3 Ways to Diversify Hiring Pools

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5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Faced with a nationwide racial reckoning, corporations are showing a heightened interest in diversifying their workforce. While data from McKinsey supports the value of diversity with growth in sales and earnings in diverse firms outperforming less diverse firms, strong commitments to seek out, hire and retain Black talent have become a moral imperative. Much of the chatter in the business world focuses on the lack of Black CEOs, and rightfully so. Since the Fortune 500 list was first published in 1955, there have been only 19 Black CEOs out of 1,800 chiefs. But there is not a quick fix to these discrepancies. It takes years to groom someone for a position in the C-Suite. Let’s go back to square one.

One solution to diversity woes lies at the genesis of the supply chain: Corporations need to diversify their hiring pools. 

Companies can find the best and the brightest from diverse communities by taking the following three actions. 

1. Expose young Black people to your industry early

Undergraduates make their choice of major based on their career aspirations, and career paths are selected as a result of exposure to an industry. A high school student who’s particularly strong in science, technology, engineering and math skills will gravitate toward an industry they know about, like medicine. Every high school student knows about the medical field because of their own personal exposure to it. They don’t immediately consider an industry like investment banking or fintech merely because they may not know what the industry encompasses, that such occupations within that industry even exist, or that a career within that sector is attainable. 

This lack of exposure is one of the reasons I created First Workings, a NYC-based nonprofit that trains and places diverse high school students from underrepresented communities in paid internships at dominant companies in their respective industries. Our interns gain exposure through an internship or mentorship at companies in sectors ranging from finance to medicine at companies such as Morgan Stanley, PJT Partners, Mount Sinai Health System and TradeWeb Markets. Exceptionally bright, diverse teenagers learn the ins and outs of what an industry is and gain an understanding of the variety of careers possible for them to pursue. 

Once a rising high school senior is exposed to worlds they did not know very much about, whether that is advertising, private equity or technology, they are far more likely to choose fields of study that are more appropriate to their career goals and will be knocking on your door for a position upon college graduation.

Related: We’ve Been Talking About the Tech Skills Gap for 10 Years. Why Hasn’t the Conversation Gotten Any More Productive?

2. Start the talent pipeline in high school

Countless corporations begin the talent pipeline far too late if they want to have a more diverse workforce. Start earlier. Provide an internship program for high schoolers or connect with a third-party provider to do the leg work for you. Internships and mentorships at an early age play a pivotal role in attracting diverse talent and providing youth from underrepresented communities with social capital. My own career in finance began with a high school internship as a runner at the Chicago Board of Trade. The connections I made there were consequential in my decades-long run on Wall Street. 

Beginning the talent pipeline in high school benefits both the corporation and the teen. The organization is able to build relationships with diverse talent before other companies. The diversity of thought that a young, diverse intern brings is invaluable. The company can maintain a relationship, offer college internships and be top of mind when it comes to making a career decision. Plus, it is becoming increasingly popular for corporations to seek talent early and not even require a college degree. Apple, Google, Netflix and Tesla all consider candidates who don’t have a four-year degree. For the diverse teens in an internship program, they have the chance to develop social capital, build strong connections and network where they otherwise may not have had the opportunity. Start earlier and find diverse talent before other companies have the chance to.

Related: How to Build an Inclusive Digital Economy, and Why We Must

3. Seek talent broadly

There is no doubt that heralded, elite universities produce talent that easily assimilates into your company and do well. But don’t dismiss recruiting from other universities or programs. If you do, your selective hiring process leads you to miss out on high-quality, underutilized talent pools. Besides, just 8 percent of students at Ivy League and other highly selective colleges and universities are Black. By prioritizing this narrow selection of graduates as your hiring pool, you are already limiting the number of Black candidates you will see.

Of all Black students who earn bachelor’s degrees, 22 percent of them come from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Prioritize recruiting from HBCUs, and (again) please resist the temptation to limit yourself to the most well-known. Widen the net. There are more than 100 HBCUs in the United States producing graduates in all industries lacking diversity.

Expand your pools even further. Look for graduates from technical programs and community colleges and people with certificates in skills specific to your industry. Incredible, diverse talent may be a good fit for your company even if they do not have a college degree. 

To truly make progress in diversity aspirations, corporations need to rethink where they look for talent. Seek out opportunities to expose young Black talent to your industry early on so they know it is a viable path for them. Start the pipeline to diverse talent in high school (far earlier than the status quo), and resist hiring from the typical narrow pool.

Related: When You Say There’s a Limited Pool of Black Talent, Here’s What You’re Revealing About Yourself

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Frustrated With a Colleague? Expectations May Be Why.

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6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


I recently celebrated my 51st birthday and reflected on the many things I’ve learned since my first startup. 

Most of my learning has come from two places—the wisdom of others intended to help me avoid mistakes and the many mistakes I made despite all their wisdom. The opportunity to practice resiliency that comes from overcoming mistakes is priceless. I’ve seen firsthand that the most challenging mistakes are the ones that involve other people.

My experience is that solving most big problems requires a team of people rallying together to figure out how to both imagine and execute solutions. The execution is often where challenges begin between people, even those dedicated and committed to the mission.The greatest anxiety, frustration and stress often come down to one thing: expectations.

I’ve seen many scenarios unfold over and over again; here are the top four:  

1. Not setting expectations 

This is the most common culprit of conflict between individuals or teams: not setting expectations in the first place. 

“We met last week about the new campaign. We agreed when the new campaign would kick off. Then today, I got copied on an email to the client, and the date was way earlier. I’m so annoyed.”

Did anyone document what was agreed to? Who circulated expectations to confirm a shared understanding? Were the client communications expectations discussed and documented?

It’s easy to see how this can happen. Two colleagues assumed they were on the same page. But without an actual page, it’s easy for things to go awry.

Related: 8 Unrealistic Expectations That Can Harm You

2. Implied expectations

This one trips me up all the time and comes in two flavors. Let’s look at the leader disruptor version first. 

“The reason I missed this deadline is that our CEO asked me to dig into some metrics on this other project, and it took longer than I expected. I thought an executive’s request was more important and prioritized accordingly.” 

This scenario is the leader’s fault—there’s an implied expectation that because a senior leader made a request, it’s urgent and takes precedence. As leaders, we should clearly set expectations—especially for individual contributors who might not know to ask about priority. I’ve gotten better with this, but it still gets me every so often. 

The other flavor is hyper-accountable vs. accountable-accountable.

“They know how important the project is to the company. I’ve talked about it in meetings every week. I gave them feedback on their draft immediately. They’ve got everything ready to launch, but the program is still not live. I’m so frustrated.”

Are they bought in? How much does this project align with their goals? Are dates set, documented, and acknowledged by everyone involved? How is the team prioritizing other projects against this one? 

The reason I see this as hyper-accountable is that one side is so accountable to everyone around them (an awesome trait) that they assume everyone else is also the same hyper-accountable, and they can’t understand why they are not. The fix is for the hyper-accountable to step back and consider the overall priorities—in addition to what they are most committed to—and adjust their expectations accordingly. 

Related: The Dangers of Overpromising and Under-Delivering

3. Managing expectations

Any project that involves multiple contributors and multiple meetings are likely to change. If expectations have been set and everyone’s agreed to them, things are off to a good start. But then the universe throws a wrench into the mix. 

“They just told me that we’re not going to launch for another month. Apparently, this was decided two weeks ago because of a technical gap, but I’m just finding out about it now. I am so defeated.” 

How to avoid this mistake is obvious when you see it, but unfortunately, it is also so easy to fall into. In a rush to solve a problem, we often forget to manage and reset expectations. 

Are there stakeholders that would benefit from an update? Perhaps a board member who asked a question about a particular project that is now delayed. Are you going to wait a few weeks until the next board meeting, or should you update them sooner?

Related: Tricks to Staying Calm Under Pressure

4. Communicating expectations 

One of my co-founder’s favorite quotes is by George Bernard Shaw: “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”

We’re all living with information overload constantly. It can be hard to figure out which email, Slack or text message is important and which can wait. Even if you do consume it all, how much are you really retaining—especially if it isn’t immediately relevant to you?

“I sent a long, comprehensive Slack update, shared the slide deck with the team…asked for their review and feedback, but no one got back to me. They’re saying they didn’t know about this policy change and that we never tell them anything. I am perplexed.” 

There’s a combination of problems here, but the biggest is ensuring that what’s communicated is actually being consumed and acknowledged. If you aren’t sure, ask. It’s a bit more work, but it tends to destress the situation. 

How does the team prefer to learn new information or participate in decisions? Do they want to be walked through the change and given the opportunity to ask questions live?

The expectation test 

When I’m observing a conflict unfolding, I do my best to assess with an expectation test. Does everyone have the same set of expectations? How would I—or they—know? If the answer is anything other than a resounding “yes,” it’s time to probe and see where the expectations may not exist, be weak, not be managed or be impacted by a communications issue. If you’re looking to defuse conflict, start with an expectation test and go from there. 

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5 Decisions All Responsible Entrepreneurs Make En Route to Financial Security

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Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Entrepreneurship inherently involves financial risk. That doesn’t mean, however, that entrepreneurs can’t become financially secure. Remember, your personal finances and business finances are not the same. Responsible entrepreneurs aren’t just focused on making their business succeed. They also take steps to achieve financial security in their personal life.

1. Create true separation between personal and business finances

Failing to separate business and personal accounts can create serious financial trouble in the long run. If the business were to fail, you would lose all the money that is also being used to pay your rent or any other expenses. Even more troublesome, liability issues could leave you on the hook for company debts or legal troubles.

Maintaining separate personal and business accounts ensures that even if your company runs into financial difficulty, your “nest egg” won’t be compromised. Paying yourself a salary from your business account can help increase this sense of separation.

Never use a business account (including credit cards) for personal expenses.

Related: 5 Personal-Finance Mistakes That Kill Promising Companies

2. Clearly define personal finance goals

While you may have established clear growth goals for your business, you can’t afford to let personal finance goals be an afterthought.

In a recent phone conversation, Tobi Roberts, co-founder and CEO of City Creek Mortgage explained, “As a business owner, you need to plan out what you’ll do with the salary you pay yourself from your company. After all, a big part of the reason why many people go into business is to support their desired lifestyle.”

Continued Roberts, “Setting clear and meaningful goals will act as a series of guideposts to help you stay on track for reaching that lifestyle. Whether you want to move into a bigger house or buy a boat, setting a savings goal will help you better control what happens after you pay yourself.”

Your personal finance goals (such as retirement or even building an emergency fund) can also affect how you structure your business’s cash flow. You need to find a balance between paying yourself enough to live your desired lifestyle without creating a cash crunch for your company.

3. Create passive income through investments

“Making your money work for you” may sound like a bit of a cliche, but it’s an important to-do for entrepreneurs trying to achieve financial security. Continued investments in the stock market allow your money to grow at a much greater rate than it would if you left it in a checking or savings account.

As Investopedia reports, the more passive, long-term buy and hold strategy averages 12.1 percent returns on small stocks and 9.9 percent returns on large stocks, even when accounting for market crashes.

By simply putting money aside into an investment account each month, your money will compound, giving you an additional revenue stream beyond your salary. You don’t need to chase the latest meme stock to increase your financial standing.

4. Religiously track spending and saving

Managing cash flow is vital for any startup — and it is just as important for your personal finances. If you don’t understand where your money is going, you might find yourself running out of money as you try to attain a lifestyle you can’t quite afford.

Tracking monthly expenses is vital for identifying ways you can better use your money. This can help you identify things you should cut out of your life — like that gym membership you never use. Or, it can put the amount of money you spend on meals at restaurants into perspective.

Writing down how much you spend each month — and what you spent it on — makes it easier to compare your current habits with your long-term financial goals so you can make necessary changes. Quite often, small sacrifices now (like investing $50 toward an investment account instead of daily Starbucks runs) will pay big dividends later.

5. Plan for the unexpected

You never know what life will throw your way. This is just as true in your personal life as it is in the business world. And of course, unexpected negative outcomes for your business can have a tremendous impact on your personal finances.

While times are good, you should prepare for the future by building an emergency savings fund. Financial experts generally recommend that most people have emergency savings that would cover three to six months of living expenses.

Notably, those with a variable income or less stable employment — a category that many entrepreneurs fall in — are advised to have an emergency fund that covers six months or more. Contribute a bit of money to your emergency fund each month. This way, if disaster strikes and you are no longer making any money from your business, you won’t need to liquidate investments or retirement funds to stay afloat.

Related: 5 Tips To Protect Your Company From Legal Liabilities

No matter what your business goals may be, you cannot make finances an afterthought. By taking steps to account for both your business and personal financial standing, you will have much-needed security.

Ultimately, financial security allows you to support the lifestyle you want to live while giving you one less thing to worry about in your hectic entrepreneurial life. Prioritize your finances early on so you can establish good habits that last a lifetime.

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Uber Mexico will give incentives for 710 million pesos to drivers and delivery people

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The Uber Mexico platform seeks to improve the income of its Uber Eats driver and delivery partners, who are generating, on average, 20% more profits than before the pandemic.


3 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


There is good news for Uber Mexico driver and delivery partners. The platform announced a stimulus plan for 710 million pesos to improve the income of its affiliates

“We want to encourage more people to benefit from the economic opportunities for self -employment and entrepreneurship offered by our platform, especially in a context of economic recovery and reactivation of our cities,” said Gretta González , general director of Shared Rides at Uber, in a statement. in Mexico.

The platform explained that said budget includes discounts in the commission for service for driving partners, as well as multipliers of earnings per trip.

The company reported that partners who used the app at least 20 hours a week to provide Uber and Uber Eats services generated 20% higher average earnings nationally and in Mexico City. This in contrast to those recorded before the lockdowns began.

“Now that cities are reactivated and vaccination campaigns continue to advance, there are more users requesting trips and orders through the Uber and Uber Eats apps, which has contributed to increases in the profits of driver and delivery partners. on the platform, ” said José García-Pimentel , CEO of Uber Eats in Mexico.

The statement clarifies that the cost of these promotions will not affect the rates paid by users of both services. In addition, the bonuses will be available to new drivers and delivery partners as well as to those previously registered on the platform, even if they decided to remain inactive during the last year.

Uber will not only give incentives in Mexico

Uber Mexico’s stimulus plan is aligned with the one announced by the platform for the United States . Last week, the company reported that it would invest about 250 million dollars (about 5 billion Mexican pesos) to offer additional incentives to its US driver partners.

This is because, as the activities suspended by the COVID-19 pandemic resume, the demand for travel exceeds the supply of drivers . Thus, Uber seeks to retain active drivers, motivate the reactivation of those who left and attract new partners.


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