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Providence-backed Kno2 raises $15M for healthcare communication tech

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Kno2 CEO Jon Elwell. (Kno2 Photo)

Kno2, a Boise, Idaho-based startup developing ways for healthcare systems to communicate with each other, has raised $15 million in new funding.

The Series A funding round was led by Seattle-based Providence Ventures, the investment arm of Providence, the largest health system in Washington state, along with Health Enterprise Partners. Providence Ventures manages about $300 million in venture capital and has backed multiple companies aiming to improve healthcare.

Kno2’s software eases the confidential transmission of patient information between healthcare providers, which can be clumsy and time-consuming and still often relies on faxing.

“Kno2 is all about interoperability. We allow providers to connect to multiple methods of exchange all in one single location,” and eliminate faxing, according to a video on the company’s website.

The company’s technology starts with its electronic secure fax system, which enables Kno2 to analyze connectivity and streamline communication with other providers. For instance, Kno2 can identify whether linked providers belong to the CommonWell Health Alliance, which standardizes health communication protocols, or other compatible systems. Providers can then switch to more direct communication methods, such as querying for patient records via direct message, through the Kno2 system.

Kno2 was founded in 2010 by Therasa Bell, president and chief technology officer, and by Dane Meuler, the company’s senior vice president of business development. Both co-founders worked previously at Imagetek, an information technology services company, Bell as vice president and chief solutions architect and Dane as vice president of business development. The leadership team also includes CEO Jon Elwell, who previously served as vice president of healthcare for the Technology Services Industry Association, a research and advisory firm.

Vendors integrated into the Kno2 system range from digital health platforms to remote patient monitoring providers, to electronic health record vendors, according to a press release. The company has signed up a large proportion of post-acute care providers such as skilled nursing, assisted living, behavior health therapies and similar providers, and is expanding into other sectors.

The new funding will enable the company to sign up new partners and expand its reach to “underserved markets,” including small-to-medium physician offices. The company had just under 20 employees at the end of 2020, and is expecting to expand hiring to 50 by the end of 2021, said Tina Feldman, vice president of corporate and product marketing.

“HEP believes that Kno2’s technology will break through the historical barriers preventing clinical information exchange on a broad basis.” said Ezra Mehlman, managing partner of Health Enterprise Partners, in the release.

This is Kno2’s first institutional funding; previous funds were raised from friends and family. In 2020, Kno2 was ranked 2107 on the Inc Magazine list the 5000 fastest growing companies in the U.S., showing revenue growth of about 200% from 2016 to 2019. Feldman said Kno2 is on track to more than double revenue this year.


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Wanna squad up in Pokémon Unite? Here’s how

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Pokémon Unite is a new 5-v-5 free-to-play MOBA on the Nintendo Switch. In this multiplayer Pokémon game, players choose from one of 20 Pokémon and battle it against one another. And what better way to celebrate a hard-fought victory than with your friends? Playing Pokémon Unite with friends is the best way to play, but playing with friends on the Nintendo Switch isn’t always the easiest thing to do, but it is possible. Here’s how to invite your friends to a play in Pokemon Unite.

How to invite friends to Pokémon Unite on the Nintendo Switch

Inviting friends to Pokémon Unite on the Nintendo Switch is pretty simple.

  1. First, go ahead and exchange friend codes with the person you want to invite.
  2. Open Pokémon Unite.
  3. At the main menu, select Unite Battle and start a lobby.

    Source: iMore

  4. Select one of the plus signs around your character or press the Y button to open up your friends list.

    How to invite friends to Pokémon Unite on the Nintendo Switch: Select one of the plus signs around your character, or press the Y button to open up your friends list.

    Source: iMore

  5. Choose the person you want to invite, and select Player Info.

    How to invite friends to Pokémon Unite on the Nintendo Switch: Choose the person you want to invite, and select Player Info.

    Source: iMore

  6. Then select Invite Friends.

    How to invite friends to Pokémon Unite on the Nintendo Switch: Then select Invite Friends.

    Source: iMore

All your friend has to do at this point is accept the invitation.

How to invite players using a Lobby ID

If you want to play with someone you’re not friends with, you can still invite them to your game without adding their friend code.

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  1. Start Pokémon Unite.
  2. At the main menu, select Unite Battle and start a lobby.
  3. At the top left of the screen, you’ll see a Lobby ID. Share that ID with whoever you’d like.

    How to invite players using a Lobby ID: At the top left of the screen, you'll see a **Lobby ID**. Share that ID with whoever you'd like.

    Source: iMore

That’s all it takes. The player joining just has to input the Lobby ID into the Lobby Search option of the main menu.

How to invite cross-platform players

Pokemon Unite is available on the Switch but will come to iOS and Android in September. You won’t need their friend code to invite them, but you’ll need to share your Trainer ID.

  1. Start Pokémon Unite.
  2. At the main menu, press L to open your Trainer Info.

    How to invite cross platform players:At the main menu, press L to open your Trainer Info.

    Source: iMore

  3. Share the code at the bottom of the screen to add your cross-platform friend.

We’ll have to put this to the test once the iOS and Android versions release this September.

Unite for the fight

Pokémon Unite is a great multiplayer game, made even better when you’re playing with friends. It also has a surprising amount of depth, so be sure to check out our Pokémon tier list to figure out who is the best Pokémon for your play style. And while you’re at it, check out all of the free gifts available for Pokémon Unite now. Coordinate with friends and claim victory!


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The next MacBook Air: Mid-2022 eyed for mini-LED M2 redesign

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Roman has covered technology since the early 1990s. His career started at MacUser, and he’s worked for MacAddict, Mac|Life, and TechTV.


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Explained: History of IPCC, the international body that reviews climate change effects-World News , Firstpost

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The body meets next week to vet and validate a summary of part one of its first major assessment in seven years.

Representational image. Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC, addresses the Copenhagen meeting in 2014. Image: IPCC

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) compiles comprehensive reviews of scientific literature on climate change, past and future.

The body meets next week to vet and validate a summary of part one of its first major assessment in seven years. Here’s a thumbnail profile of the panel.

History

The IPCC was set up in 1988 by the UN’s World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) and Environment Programme (UNEP).

Its mandate is to give policymakers neutral, science-based updates about global warming — physical science, climate impacts, and scenarios for bringing the problem under control. Providing explicit policy recommendations is not part of its mandate.

An intergovernmental body, the IPCC currently counts 195 member countries.

Organisation

Based in Geneva, the panel is chaired by South Korea’s Hoesung Lee, an expert on the economics of climate change.

Its reports are compiled by thousands of atmospheric scientists, climate modellers, oceanographers, ice specialists, economists and public health experts, mostly drawn from universities and research institutes. They work on a volunteer basis.

The IPCC does not conduct new research but trawls through thousands of published studies and summarises key findings, indicating degrees of likelihood and confidence.

It is often described as the biggest peer-review exercise in the world.

Assessment reports

Every five or six years the IPCC produces vast overviews, typically several thousand pages long. The first came out in 1990, the most recent in 2014.

Three separate teams, or “working groups”, look at the physical science of global warming, climate change impacts and options for tackling the problem. Each working group’s report is published separately, followed by a final “synthesis report”.

The sixth assessment cycle, like those before it, will produce reports in four instalments: working group one’s findings will be made public on August 9; working group two’s in February 2022; working group three’s in March 2022; and a final synthesis in the autumn of 2022.

Summary for policymakers

The IPCC concludes each review with a crucial summary for policymakers that undergoes multiple rounds of editing, first by scientists and then by government officials.

The last draft is submitted to an IPCC plenary, which vets it line-by-line before approval by consensus.

Governments can seek amendments to the summary, which are approved if the argument is supported by what is in the underlying report written by the scientists.

Special reports

Member nations can request so-called “special reports” between major assessments. Since 2014, there have been three.

A special report on global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius came out in October 2018; one on land use, agriculture and food security in August 2019; and another on oceans and Earth’s frozen regions, known as the cryosphere, in September 2019.

Nobel prize & critics

Defenders of the IPCC say that its exhaustive work, and a summary for policymakers endorsed by the world’s governments, give it exceptional clout.

“It’s unique in science, and it’s uniquely powerful in science,” Peter Thorne, a lead author of the sixth assessment and a professor at Maynooth University in Ireland, told AFP.

“There is no other field that has for decades undertaken such a robust assessment process.”

Its 2014 report provided the scientific underpinning for the landmark Paris Agreement, inked outside the French capital in 2015.

The 2007 edition earned the IPCC a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, alongside former US vice president and climate campaigner Al Gore.

The IPCC’s image was later dented by several minor errors uncovered in the report that provided ammunition for sceptics who claim the IPCC is flawed or biased.

More recently, some scientists have said the panel is too conservative, leading it to underestimate the climate change threat.

The last published report, for example, did not factor in potential contribution to sea-level rise — widely recognised today — from melting ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland.

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