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Turn on Apple Music Lossless and Dolby Atmos for the best experience

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Source: Christine Romero-Chan / iMore

Apple Music just got a big update with Spatial Audio with Dolby Atmos and Lossless Audio support. The best news about this is that you don’t even need access to iOS 15 to get this upgrade because it’s done server-side on Apple’s end. Even if you’re still on the latest version of iOS 14, you should be able to access Dolby Atmos and Lossless Audio.

But before you can immerse yourself in this unique and elevated music listening experience, you want to make sure that they’re enabled first. Here’s how to turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio and Dolby Atmos on iPhone and iPad.

How to turn on Apple Music Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio

It’s important to note that Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio is actually on by default. However, you’ll have the option to turn it off completely, or have it Always On, even when listening with headphones that don’t support Dolby Atmos — if you go this route, you’ll be listening to Dolby Atmos versions of supported songs instead of stereo versions.

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  1. Launch Settings on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Scroll down and select Music.
  3. Tap Dolby Atmos. The default option is Automatic.

    Turn on Apple Music Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio on iPhone by showing: Launch Settings, tap Music, tap Dolby Atmos

    Source: iMore

  4. Choose whether you want to change the setting to Always On or Off.

    Turn on Apple Music Dolby Atmos Spatial Audio on iPhone by showing: Tap if you want Automatic (default), Always On, or Off. Keep in mind that Always On replaces Stereo quality on all headphones, even those that don't enhance Dolby Atmos quality

    Source: iMore

Again, while you can listen to Dolby Atmos audio with any pair of headphones, you will need to make sure that the setting is on Always On. Otherwise, if it is left on Automatic, you can only get Dolby Atmos versions of tracks with Apple and Beats headphones, which are designed to handle Dolby Atmos audio much better. This includes AirPods, AirPods Pro, AirPods Max, BeatsX, Beats Solo3 Wireless, Beats Studio3, Powerbeats3 Wireless, Beats Flex, Powerbeats Pro, or Beats Solo Pro.

How to turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio

Apple Music Lossless Audio is a little different from the Dolby Atmos version. With Apple Lossless Audio Codec (ALAC), it’s supposed to preserve every detail of the original audio. Basically, this is how the music was intended to be heard by the original artist. Keep in mind that Apple Music Lossless Audio will consume significantly more data than the High Efficiency or High Quality formats that Apple Music used before.

  1. Launch Settings on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Scroll down and select Music.
  3. Tap Audio Quality.

    Turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio on iPhone by showing: Launch Settings, tap Music, tap Audio Quality

    Source: iMore

  4. Tap the toggle for Lossless Audio to ON (green).

    Turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio on iPhone by showing: Tap the toggle for Lossless Audio, then tap what setting you want to change for Cellular and Wi-Fi streaming or downloads

    Source: iMore

  5. Under Cellular Streaming, Wi-Fi Streaming, and Downloads, select the audio quality that you want. Lossless starts at up to 24-bit/48kHz, while High-Resolution Lossless goes up to 24-bit/192kHz.

    Turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio on iPhone by showing: Confirm that you want to stream Lossless Quality over cellular if you select it, but Apple doesn't recommend it. Standard lossless goes up to 24-bit/48kHz and High-Resolution Lossless goes up to 24-bit/192kHz

    Source: iMore

Remember that choosing a lossless quality for cellular streaming will use a significant amount of data over the default High Quality option, and Apple does not actually recommend it. You’ll want to make sure that you have an unlimited data plan with your carrier on the best iPhone or iPad before choosing this option.

It’s also good to note that any content that you had downloaded previously will continue to play in the original downloaded resolution. So if you want to have a lossless quality download, you’ll want to delete the original songs and re-download them in Lossless or High-Resolution Lossless format.

Questions?

When it comes down to how to turn on Apple Music Lossless Audio and Dolby Atmos on iPhone and iPad, it’s pretty easy. You need to make sure that you have a good cellular data plan, plenty of storage space on your device, and a great pair of headphones to immerse yourself in.

Have more questions about Apple Music Lossless Audio and Dolby Atmos? Drop them in the comments.


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Windows 11 will change how you use your PC

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People who want to jump between entirely different desktops can do that, too. Not only can you have different desktops for home, school and work, but they’ll also follow you around to whatever Windows 11 computer you’re using. Your different computers can sync up over the cloud: Leave work, open your laptop at home, and your screen should be just how you left it — windows, tabs and all. The Start menu even saves your most recent files, so you don’t have to click around to reopen them.

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BuzzFeed Confirms Plan to Go Public

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BuzzFeed, the digital publisher known for viral content, announced on Thursday its plan to go public through a merger with a special purpose acquisition company, signaling a shift in the business strategy of the once high-flying media start-up.

BuzzFeed said it planned to merge with a publicly listed shell company, 890 Fifth Avenue Partners, in what is known as a SPAC deal. It will be valued at $1.5 billion, a decline from its 2016 valuation of $1.7 billion. As part of the proposed transaction, BuzzFeed will raise $438 million, with $150 million of that coming as debt financing.

BuzzFeed also announced that it would acquire Complex Networks in the deal for a total of $300 million, with $200 million in cash and the rest in stock. Known primarily for its pop culture coverage, Complex also hosts events on food, sports and sneaker collecting.

Jonah Peretti, the founder and chief executive of BuzzFeed, announced the merger at a news conference at the company’s Manhattan headquarters. “This is a very exciting day for BuzzFeed and a great day for our employees and our partners,” he said.

Once seen as the future of the media, BuzzFeed has become something of an outlier in an industry that has lately rewarded subscription-driven publications and newsletter platforms. If the investors in 890 Fifth Avenue vote in favor of the transaction, BuzzFeed expects to close the deal by the end of the year, and the shares will trade under ticker symbol BZFD.

Adam Rothstein, the executive chairman of 890 Fifth Avenue Partners and a venture investor known for investments in Israeli tech start-ups, will join BuzzFeed’s board. Made up of veterans from the worlds of finance and media, the board includes current and former executives at ESPN, NBC, Playboy, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Subversive Capital and the A&E cable network.

BuzzFeed’s institutional shareholders, which include media giants like NBCUniversal and venture capitalists, will be subject to a six-month lockup period after the deal closes, preventing them from selling shares immediately. But former BuzzFeed employees should be able to cash out any shares they may own as soon as the company goes public. Mr. Peretti said in an interview that he would have majority control over the new BuzzFeed once the merger closes through a special class of shares.

“To me it was important to have the ability to really focus on the long term of the company and balance all the constituencies and stakeholders and to have founder control was a way to do that,” he said. Other publicly traded media companies, including The New York Times, have similar arrangements.

Mr. Peretti’s growth strategy appears to hinge on acquiring companies — in part to gain leverage over major distributors like Google and Facebook, but also because BuzzFeed has yet to achieve the kind of needed scale on its own.

In 2018, he quietly sought possible mergers with competitors such as Vice Media, Group Nine and Vox Media. In November, Mr. Peretti orchestrated BuzzFeed’s acquisition of HuffPost, the site he helped found in 2005 with Arianna Huffington and the investor Kenneth Lerer.

With the addition of Complex, BuzzFeed expects revenue to grow 24 percent to $521 million this year with pretax profit of about $57 million. Next year, it estimates revenue will hit $654 million and pretax profit $117 million.

Still, that may not be enough.

“We’ll have opportunities to pursue more acquisitions, and there are more exciting companies out there that we want to pursue,” Mr. Peretti said during the news conference on Thursday.

When asked which companies he might look to acquire, he responded: “I don’t know. You have any ideas?”

Hatched out of a small office in New York’s Chinatown in 2006, when Mr. Peretti was the chief technology officer of The Huffington Post, BuzzFeed started as an experiment in creating content meant to be shared on the web. He left what is now HuffPost in 2011, after AOL bought it for $315 million, and ended up transforming his project into a stand-alone media company with the help of $35 million from investors.

BuzzFeed soon became one of the fastest-growing digital publishers, eventually raising $500 million, and was hailed as the future of news media. But in recent years, it has missed ambitious revenue targets, and some of its investors have agitated for a sale.

After a series of layoffs in 2019, BuzzFeed started to diversify its business, selling branded cookware and ramping up its product recommendation section, garnering a commission on each sale through affiliate agreements with Amazon and other companies. “Our model evolved,” Mr. Peretti said in an interview last year.

SPAC deals, once an arcane Wall Street maneuver, have become more common over the last year. Special purpose acquisition companies — shell corporations that list on a stock exchange — are usually created with the goal of buying a private business and taking it public.

Group Nine, the BuzzFeed rival, has gone a different route. It created a SPAC of its own in December, with the aim of finding a company to acquire before going public.

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Crackonosh: How hackers are using gamers to become crypto-rich

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Crackonosh malware, which mines for cryptocurrency, is being hidden in free versions of popular games.
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